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List of Common Wild Edible Plants and Weeds
 
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Many of the plants we call weeds were brought to our country (USA) by immigrants who have used the plants as food or they are escaped cultivars that have been grown for food purposes at one time or another in history. We consider them weeds because they grow easily where we don't want them. Most are not familiar with the plants they deem weeds and don't know their names or that they may have benefits. In fact, many of these "weeds" are more nutritious than what we get at the grocery stores and sometimes more so than what is growing next to them. Yep, that's right. I said the weeds you are pulling out of your garden so your carrots, tomatoes or corn can grow uninhibited might be more valuable as food than the other crops you have growing. At the very least this list should give you a little appreciation for these plants and the ability to identify something more that can be cultivated and let's face it. For some of us this might be all that lives.
 
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1) Blue Mustard (Chorispora tenella)

Native to Eurasia, this mustard plant is seen in many parts of the world In early spring often when there is still snow on the ground you will see this delicious mustard poking up out of the ground. Soon it will be a blanket of violet in open fields. it will usually be full grown before farmers begin to plant. It is known by many common names, including purple mustard (seems to make sense when looking at the flower), blue mustard, musk mustard (because of the strong odor?), and crossflower. I've also seen people misidentify this as Wild Radish. They are both in the same family so I can understand how this happens but the wild radish will be a much bigger plant. 
 
Blue mustard is good as a green when added to salads or sandwiches or if you like you can use it as a cooked green in recipes. It has a delicious slightly spicy flavor reminiscent of radish (a close relative). The flavor gets spicier with older or struggling plants. 
Once the heat hits, this plant will quickly go to seed and dry up.
 
As I have been updating the site I have noticed some pages like this one that need some updating. I have decided it is time to make use of quality categorizing for the size of database I will be creating. Look for additional updates to these top level pages as the site continues to grow.